Oct 28
Young people in and from the child welfare system have long been working towards changing how they are cared for, their transition out of state care, and ensuring support past their 18th birthday. In Canada, the network of provincial Youth In Care agencies across the country have been at the forefront of ensuring these matters are addressed. The national body working with all these provincial organizations is Youth In Care Canada (YICC). In this episode of CYC Podcast the new president of YICC speaks about the organization, some of the pressing issues facing young people in and transitioning out of care, and how those working with young people can support these clear calls for action.
To learn more about YICC, please visit https://youthincare.ca/ 

 

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Sep 30

This week’s episode is a conversation with Kismet Meyon, Dr. Maggie Inchley, and Dr. Sylvan Baker from The Verbatim Formula. The Verbatim Formula is “a participatory research project for care-experienced young people. It uses verbatim theatre techniques, listening and dialogue to work with young people, care leavers, social workers, and universities” which “aim[s] to work with young people to make care and education better” (http://www.theverbatimformula.org.uk/).

During our conversation Kismet, Maggie, and Sylvan discuss the process that The verbatim Formula uses, the impacts on them and others as creators, how it is received by those who see their performances (including service providers), and the results of their research.

Visit their website to hear clips and learn more about the innovative and necessary work they create.

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Jul 29

This episode begins with a monologue about being young, queer, and navigating drinking & drug culture in the lesbian community. Claire the writer/performer (not her real name) and I then have a conversation about some of the themes raised in the piece. Specifically, the attraction of alcohol to young queer folx, the challenges of not drinking, and how to support young people navigating that space.

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Mar 04

Awarded as the “Artist For Peace 2018” by the Quebec-based artist collective “Les artistes pour la paix,” Aquil Virani is a visual artist who integrates public participation into his socially-conscious art projects. Following the Quebec City mosque shooting, Aquil paid tribute to the six men who have lost their lives that day by painting six portraits. 

Episode Transcript coming soon
 
Aquil Virani a été nommé « Artiste pour la paix 2018 » grâce à l'importance qu’il place sur les pratiques artistiques accessibles et les questions sociales. Né d’une mère d’origine française et d’un père d’origine indienne, il est un artiste animé par le désir de communiquer des idées socialement pertinentes de manière accessible, interactive et engageante. Suite à l’attaque terroriste à la Mosquée de Québec, Aquil a tenu à rendre hommage aux six hommes qui y ont perdu la vie, à travers six portraits.

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Feb 12

On this episode of Your Right to Speak Salvatore talks with RudeGang Entertainment. Rudegang Entertainment is an Indigenous Hip Hop & Multimedia group based in the Greater Vancouver Area, B.C. In the conversation RudeGang members discuss music, advocacy, inspiring young people, and resisting colonialism.

Be Sure to check out Their new single Tides on Soundcloud

Follow Rudegang Entertainment on Instagram @RudegangEnt and be sure to check out #RisingYouth and the grants we provide at www.risingyouth.ca

Let’s Raise Awareness together! 

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Feb 05

On this week’s episode of the #RisingYouth Podcast, Jade Roberts Host of Still Here Still healing sits down with Mackenzie talking about her contribution to the Red Dress Project. Mackenzie our Alumni was inspired by the work Jamie Black, the Red Dress project is a response to the more than 1000 indigenous women who are missing or have been murdered in Canada. Symbolizing the indigenous women who are stolen from their families, an arrangement of red dresses are displayed in a public place. Mackenzie brought the project to her hometown of Fort McMurray to help raise awareness and educate other youth.

 

For more information regarding to help turn a passion into action visit: https://www.risingyouth.ca/

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Jan 29

This episode, a collaboration between CYC Podcast and #Rising Youth, a program of Taking It Global, is a conversation with Justine Yu. Justine talks about the magazine and community building project called Living Hyphen. Living Hyphen began as a journal that explores the experiences of hyphenated Canadians – that is, individuals who call Canada home but who have roots in faraway places.

To learn more about the Living Hyphen please see https://livinghyphen.ca/ or visit their blog at https://medium.com/living-hyphen. And to find out how to signup for your own grant go to https://www.risingyouth.ca/ 

For our french listeners please check out this link!

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Dec 25
This conversation with Michael Furdyk and Jennifer Corriero introduces an exciting new pilot partnership between CYC Podcast and #Rising Youth (https://www.risingyouth.ca/) a project of Taking it Global (https://www.tigweb.org/). Jennifer and Michael introduce #Rising Youth TakingItGlobal, speak about some of the projects they support, and why we are doing this collaboration. We also talk about the politics of language when creating podcasts in a multi-lingual country. 
 
Starting in January, CYC Podcast will start doing a French language podcast each month, we will also be doing bilingual podcasts, and will be working towards providing transcripts of the podcasts in at least two languages. By February we will increase our schedule to deliver a podcast every Wednesday, hosted by a variety of people. Salvatore will continue on the 2nd Wednesday of the month and Wolfgang will still be on the last Wednesday. We will be adding new hosts on the 1st, 3rd (and when there are 5 Wednesday’s, the 4th) Wednesday of each month.
 
We are excited about these changes and look forward to developing new, diverse, and engaging conversations in the coming months.

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Nov 27

This is part 2 of the conversation begun in October, 2019. Melanie Doucet and Harrison Pratt discuss the Photovoice research project titled Relationships Matter for Youth “Aging Out” of Care (https://www.yumpu.com/document/view/59918518/relationships-matter-e-book). Melanie and Harrison are both researchers with direct experience living in the child welfare system. In this episode, they discuss the place of arts in research, the Photovoice process, and analyzing images for themes.

To learn more about the project please visit:

Relationships Matter Project video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5lmPDZ360ow&t=40s

·         Relationships Matter Photo E-Book: https://www.yumpu.com/document/view/59918518/relationships-matter-e-book

·         Relationships Matter Executive Summary + Research report (child welfare policy & practice oriented), published via the BC Representative for Children and Youth: https://rcybc.ca/reports-and-publications/reports/relationships-matter-youth-aging-out-care

 ·         Megaphone Magazine cover story and article, January 2019, What do YOUth think? Research project that aims to improve B.C.'s foster care system goes straight to the source.

·         Tyee article, December 13, 2018, Want to fix foster care? Ask kids who have been through the system

·         Tyee article, December 15, 2017, Creating Connections Through Photography

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Sep 11

On today’s episodes of  A Right to Speak  Salvatore talks with returning guest Alyssa. Alyssa is current a masters student at Ryerson’s Child and Youth care program. Alyssa will be talking to us about some her research regarding her thesis which she is currently conducting. Alyssa will be explaining to us how youth in care need a better system put in place for their transitional periods. Thank you Alyssa and we hope to have you on the show once your thesis is complete.  

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Aug 28
This episode is a recording made at the 22nd South African National Association of Child and Youth Care & 4th CYC-Net world conference, which took place in Durban South Africa of June 2019. The presenter was Werner van der Westhuizen, from Port Elizabeth, South Africa 
 
The following is the conference abstract:
“During 2018 the presenter, a former director at a residential child care centre, was contacted by a number of the former residents via Facebook wishing to reconnect with each other. As discussions started regarding a possible reunion, the presenter was struck by how the perspectives of these young people have changed and evolved over the past couple of years and suggested to them having discussions about their views and experiences. Following an overwhelmingly positive response, a series of conversations were arranged where both these young people and former director “come full circle” as for the first time, they talk honestly about their relationships and experiences with each other years after they left the residential care centre. 
This presentation offers the highlights from these discussions as a process of mutual meaning-making unfolded between the former director and the young people. Some of the highlights of these discussions include their views on aspects of child and youth care work that affected them, such as de-institutionalisation, residential child care workers versus shift workers, the absence of male role models, structure and routines and values. As they reflect on their childhood while in residential care and how their experiences of independent living have evolved their perspectives on child residential care, many express a desire to “return to their home” and become involved in the care of children now in residential care. Now adults, they also considered how these experiences contributed to their own value systems and shaped the way they view both their past and the future, the society they wish to live in and how they want to shape society for future generations. 
The views and experiences of these young people offer additional insights and possible practice implications for practitioners in the child and youth care field.”

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Jul 10

On this episode of Your Right to Speak Salvatore talks with youth who are part of Olori. Olori is a project formed by multiple organizations that work with Black youth around Blackness and identity. The focus on this episode is on anti-Black racism in the school system. Sharifa, Lukman, Isaiahm, Pikmen the episode are candid about their experiences in the school system and how they have seen and experienced discrimination. The conversation then turns the topic of du-rags and how their school has banned on them. The interviewees explain what du-rags mean to them and how society sees them. Please note: since the episode was recorded the school has lifted their ban on du-rags from a petition students started. Let’s Raise Awareness Together!      

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Mar 27

Dr. Jen Couch contextualizes her insights from practice and research with young people who came to Australia as refugees. In the conversation we start by reflecting on the murders at the Al Noor Mosque and the Linwood Islamic Centre in Christchurch, Aotearoa/New Zealand, we then move into discussing relational work with young people. Dr. Couch closes by speaking about the benefits of working with young people from a refugee rights model, in contrast to a needs model.

Dr. Couch is a senior lecturer in the Faculty of Education and Arts at the Australian Catholic University, which she came to after working extensively in the youth and community sectors of Australia and South Asia. Including with many young people who lived as refugees.

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Mar 13

On this episode of Your Right to Speak Rosa talks with Salvatore about some of the challenges she has faced from CYCPs and social workers due to being of mixed ethnicity. The conversation then turns to how Rosa has been able to navigate through the social constructs society has placed her in.

Let's Raise Awareness Together.  

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Feb 27

Drawing upon his own work in residential care and as a foster parent, Dr. Smith talks about care as an action and a disposition. He discusses several theories and aspects related to care, what it looks like in practice, the relationship between care and love, and some of the difficulties regarding care in this current managerialist climate.

Dr. Mark Smith spent about 20 years working in residential care before moving into academia. He has published widely on topics related to residential care, ideas of love in child and youth care, historical abuse in residential care, and in 2018 co-edited a book titled Social Work in a Changing Scotland. Dr. Smith currently teaches at the University of Dundee in Scotland.

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