Apr 27

Hiring Care is an audio drama inquiry created from one-on-one conversations with 10 child and youth care practitioners (CYCPs) “from care” (CYCPfC). Most of the script is verbatim, meaning the words spoken by the actors are (mostly) re-enactments of what CYCPfC said in the conversations. The conversations have been re-arranged and different CYCPfC have been put into relationships with each other, even though they never actually spoke with each other during the recorded conversations. Three of the characters (B, Ellisha, and Terri) are composites of two different people.

Hiring Care is constructed as a conversation between a group of seven CYCPs “from care” (CYCPfC) who are meeting to talk about creating a way to support agencies who want to hire practitioners with child welfare experience. This frame for the structure came out of an idea mentioned by one of the conversationalists (Charlotte), who said she and some of her colleagues “wanted to create a booklet about how to support someone with lived experience in care in your organization, who works for you”. Hiring Carehas seven different episodes, each one introduced by a different character and addressing different themes, although there are some overlaps between the different episodes.

While the script follows a chronological order, it is not necessary to listen to them in a particular order. You might find it more relevant to pick specific themes (identified with each episode) and listen to that particular conversation.

To learn more about the project, please visit www.TuningIntoCYC.org

Charlie challenges the group to think beyond their understandings regarding the benefits of being from care, and pushes the white CYCPfC to think of the cultural costs for Indigenous and other racialized young people incurred by going into child protection services.

 

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Apr 20

Hiring Care is an audio drama inquiry created from one-on-one conversations with 10 child and youth care practitioners (CYCPs) “from care” (CYCPfC). Most of the script is verbatim, meaning the words spoken by the actors are (mostly) re-enactments of what CYCPfC said in the conversations. The conversations have been re-arranged and different CYCPfC have been put into relationships with each other, even though they never actually spoke with each other during the recorded conversations. Three of the characters (B, Ellisha, and Terri) are composites of two different people.

Hiring Care is constructed as a conversation between a group of seven CYCPs “from care” (CYCPfC) who are meeting to talk about creating a way to support agencies who want to hire practitioners with child welfare experience. This frame for the structure came out of an idea mentioned by one of the conversationalists (Charlotte), who said she and some of her colleagues “wanted to create a booklet about how to support someone with lived experience in care in your organization, who works for you”. Hiring Carehas seven different episodes, each one introduced by a different character and addressing different themes, although there are some overlaps between the different episodes.

While the script follows a chronological order, it is not necessary to listen to them in a particular order. You might find it more relevant to pick specific themes (identified with each episode) and listen to that particular conversation.

To learn more about the project, please visit www.TuningIntoCYC.org

Leela and Terri have an uncomfortable conversation after Terri reaches out to Leela asking for help to “diversify” the group of CYCP from care.

 

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Apr 13

Hiring Care is an audio drama inquiry created from one-on-one conversations with 10 child and youth care practitioners (CYCPs) “from care” (CYCPfC). Most of the script is verbatim, meaning the words spoken by the actors are (mostly) re-enactments of what CYCPfC said in the conversations. The conversations have been re-arranged and different CYCPfC have been put into relationships with each other, even though they never actually spoke with each other during the recorded conversations. Three of the characters (B, Ellisha, and Terri) are composites of two different people.

Hiring Care is constructed as a conversation between a group of seven CYCPs “from care” (CYCPfC) who are meeting to talk about creating a way to support agencies who want to hire practitioners with child welfare experience. This frame for the structure came out of an idea mentioned by one of the conversationalists (Charlotte), who said she and some of her colleagues “wanted to create a booklet about how to support someone with lived experience in care in your organization, who works for you”. Hiring Carehas seven different episodes, each one introduced by a different character and addressing different themes, although there are some overlaps between the different episodes.

While the script follows a chronological order, it is not necessary to listen to them in a particular order. You might find it more relevant to pick specific themes (identified with each episode) and listen to that particular conversation.

To learn more about the project, please visit www.TuningIntoCYC.org

 

The group finds common ground identifying the many ways they felt failed by their time in the child welfare system.

 

 

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Apr 06

Hiring Care is an audio drama inquiry created from one-on-one conversations with 10 child and youth care practitioners (CYCPs) “from care” (CYCPfC). Most of the script is verbatim, meaning the words spoken by the actors are (mostly) re-enactments of what CYCPfC said in the conversations. The conversations have been re-arranged and different CYCPfC have been put into relationships with each other, even though they never actually spoke with each other during the recorded conversations. Three of the characters (B, Ellisha, and Terri) are composites of two different people.

Hiring Care is constructed as a conversation between a group of seven CYCPs “from care” (CYCPfC) who are meeting to talk about creating a way to support agencies who want to hire practitioners with child welfare experience. This frame for the structure came out of an idea mentioned by one of the conversationalists (Charlotte), who said she and some of her colleagues “wanted to create a booklet about how to support someone with lived experience in care in your organization, who works for you”. Hiring Carehas seven different episodes, each one introduced by a different character and addressing different themes, although there are some overlaps between the different episodes.

While the script follows a chronological order, it is not necessary to listen to them in a particular order. You might find it more relevant to pick specific themes (identified with each episode) and listen to that particular conversation.

To learn more about the project, please visit www.TuningIntoCYC.org

 

In their first conversation as a group, 5 child and youth care practitioners from care (CYCPfC) talk about trying to work in the same system that raised them. After some awkward moments, the group seeks common ground through identifying the challenges of being in care and the wisdom/benefits they take into their work.

 

Themes/Key words: Identity, Empathy, Compassion, Trauma

 

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Apr 01

In this episode Wolfgang Vachon says goodbye as host of CYC Podcast. He also talks about the new team taking over the podcast : Vivian Patruno, Salvatore D’Agatstino, and Christopher Cottle; and introduces a new audio drama inquiry called Hiring Care.

What happens when you work in the same system that raised you? Charlotte, a new CYCP “from care”, struggles to understand what care means when your lived experience wasn’t always full of care.

Hiring Care is an audio drama inquiry created from one-on-one conversations with 10 child and youth care practitioners (CYCPs) “from care” (CYCPfC). Most of the script is verbatim, meaning the words spoken by the actors are (mostly) re-enactments of what CYCPfC said in the conversations. The conversations have been re-arranged and different CYCPfC have been put into relationships with each other, even though they never actually spoke with each other during the recorded conversations. Three of the characters (B, Ellisha, and Terri) are composites of two different people.

Hiring Care is constructed as a conversation between a group of seven CYCPs “from care” (CYCPfC) who are meeting to talk about creating a way to support agencies who want to hire practitioners with child welfare experience. This frame for the structure came out of an idea mentioned by one of the conversationalists (Charlotte), who said she and some of her colleagues “wanted to create a booklet about how to support someone with lived experience in care in your organization, who works for you”. Hiring Carehas seven different episodes, each one introduced by a different character and addressing different themes, although there are some overlaps between the different episodes.

While the script follows a chronological order, it is not necessary to listen to them in a particular order. You might find it more relevant to pick specific themes (identified with each episode) and listen to that particular conversation.

To learn more about the project, please visit www.TuningIntoCYC.org

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Feb 23

On this episode, Salvatore, talks with #RisingYouth Alumni Mia Otokiak, who organized a a workshop series celebrating the ecology of the Arctic, Inuit Qaujimajatuqangit, and youth leadership. We learn about the importance of plankton and marine mammals in the arctic maritime food chain.  
This episode of the #RisingYouth Podcast was developed in partnership with the CYC Podcast. For more information on #RisingYouth Community Service Grants of up to $1,500 available to youth 15-30, visit https://www.risingyouth.ca
//
Dans cet épisode, Salvatore, l'animateur du podcast CYC, s'entretient avec Mia Otokiak, une Alumni de #JeunesEnAction, qui a organisé une série d'ateliers sur l'écologie de l'Arctique, l'Inuit Qaujimajatuqangit et le leadership des jeunes. Nous en apprenons sur l'importance du plancton et des mammifères marins dans la chaîne alimentaire maritime arctique.
Cet épisode du podcast #JeunesEnAction a été développé en partenariat avec le CYC Podcast. Pour plus d'informations sur les subventions de service communautaire #JeunesEnAction, d'un montant maximal de 1 500 dollars, destinées aux jeunes de 15 à 30 ans, visitez le site https://www.jeunesenaction.com/

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Jan 26

On this episode, Vivian Patruno, Host of the CYC Podcast, talks with #RisingYouth Alumni Rebecca Gibbons, who created The Neighbourhood Story Project, in which residents in Ottawa's Sandy Hill neighourhood, were invited to record a 2-5 minute audio story of their experiences living during the COVID-19 pandemic to promote community solidarity and connection during social distancing. 

This episode of the #RisingYouth Podcast was developed in partnership with the CYC Podcast. For more information on #RisingYouth Community Service Grants of up to $1,500 available to youth 15-30, visit https://www.risingyouth.ca

//

Dans cet épisode, Vivian Patruno, animatrice du CYC Podcast, s'entretient avec Rebecca Gibbons, une Alumni de #JeunesEnAction, qui a créé le projet " Neighbourhood Story ", dans le cadre duquel les habitants du quartier Sandy Hill d'Ottawa ont été invités à enregistrer un récit audio de 2 à 5 minutes sur leurs expériences de vie pendant la pandémie de COVID-19, afin de promouvoir la solidarité et les liens communautaires dans un contexte de distanciation sociale. 

Cet épisode du podcast #JeunesEnAction a été développé en partenariat avec le CYC Podcast. Pour plus d'informations sur les subventions de service communautaire #JeunesEnAction, d'un montant maximal de 1 500 dollars, destinées aux jeunes de 15 à 30 ans, visitez le site https://www.jeunesenaction.com/

 

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Dec 29

This episode is a recording of a Child and Youth Care graduate school information panel that took place November 30, 2021. Graduate school programs were represented by Natasha Blanchet-Cohen from Concordia University’s Graduate Diploma in Youth Work; Graham McPheat from the University of Strathclyde’s MSc in Child and Youth Care Studies; Alison Gerlach from the University of Victoria’s Masters and PhD programs in Child, Youth, Family and Community Studies; and Julian Hasford from the University formally known as Ryerson’s MA in Child and Youth Care.

We only recorded the faculty presentations. This was done to allow student presenters to speak freely about their educational experiences both good and not so great. Student presenters included Crystal Harrison, Caroline Moore, Emily Hellard, Wolfgang Vachon, and Juanita Stephen. If you would like to see a video of the presentation, you can go to CYC-Net.org.

To learn more about the programs discussed please visit:

Concordia University

University of Strathclyde

University of Victoria

x-University

 

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Nov 24

In this episode A. Longoria talks about “identity-sustaining practices” in Child and Youth Care, education, and academia. They begin by asking how can/do queer, trans, IBPOC educators & CYCPs remain who they are within and across the spaces they work, so that practitioners and educators can help those they work with remain who they are. In response, A. Longoria discusses corporality, aesthetics, identity, and queering the norms of practice inside the classroom and out in the world.

To read the article this conversation refers to visit: https://journals.uvic.ca/index.php/ijcyfs/article/view/20343

To purchase their newest book Creating a Home in Schools: Sustaining Identities for Black, Indigenous, and Teachers of Color please visit:

https://www.tcpress.com/creating-a-home-in-schools-9780807765265 (USA)

 

 

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Oct 27

Wolfgang speaks with Audrey Wolfe and Mattie Walker about the recently published special issue of the International Journal of Child, youth, and Family Studies titled Possibilities, Futures, and Queer World-Making in CYC. This is the first queer themed special issue in any CYC journal. Audrey and Mattie speak about how the issue came about, some of the pieces published, and why they think there is a need for such a focused issue.

The journal can be found at https://journals.uvic.ca/index.php/ijcyfs/issue/view/1518  

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Sep 01

This month we are showcasing episode 7 from ReFiled, a research-based fiction podcast created with Child and Youth Care practitioners who have residential placement experience. You can listen to the complete series at www.Refiled.ca, or on iTunes , Spotify, and Google Podcasts. 

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Jul 28

David Lewis-Pert and Meagan Lindley talk about their work at the Ontario Association of Children’s Aid Societies (OACAS) and the annual YouthCAN conference for young people in the child welfare system. 

This year’s conference title is Beyond Survive: THRIVE! with a focus on topics related to health and wellbeing for young people in and from child protection services. Meagan and David discuss paths to thriving for those in care, ways peers can foster wellbeing, and suggestions for adults who support young people.

Link to YouthCan:

http://www.oacas.org/what-we-do/youthcan/

Our host Wolfgang Vachon's has his own research project/podcast titled 

ReFiled, a drama inquiry with child and youth care practitioners with residential care experience. 

 

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Jul 14

On this episode Chanice McAnuff of (founder of Project Outsoders) and Vivian Patruno (Producer and Editor) continue their discussion  regarding their experience growing up in foster care with social workers and staff. The two reflect on the system gaps in their experience and how social workers and housing staff have the power to impact youth in tremendous ways. 

 

For more information on the programs we provide please visit https://www.risingyouth.caand https://www.tigweb.org 

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Jun 30

Sean Elliott discusses his recently completed study with graduates of college or university programs and who have lived in residential placement. Sean, who identifies as a “foster care alumni” talks about why he used an asset-based approach by focusing on success factors, learnings from the study, and how educators and others can support students with residential care histories.

This conversation is a follow-up to our discussion last month about ReFiled an audio drama inquiry with child and youth care practitioners with residential care experience, and the conversation series we hosted by Project Outsiders.

 

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Jun 23

On this episode Chanice McAnuff of (founder of Project Outsoders) and Vivian Patruno (Producer and Editor) discuss their experience growing up in foster care with social workers and staff. The two reflect on the system gaps in their experience and how social workers and housing staff have the power to impact youth in tremendous ways. 

 

For more information on the programs we provide please visit https://www.risingyouth.caand https://www.tigweb.org 

 

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